PERPETUATE THE CULTURE (Hoʻomau i ka Moʻomeheu)

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Directed by: Anyssa Iwamoto 2013 | 7 min.

Section: Student Showcase

Countries: United States

Languages: English, Hawaiian

Genres: Educational


Synopsis

A Hawaiian teenage boy and his friends are tasked with preparing May Day, an informal hula festival, where the Hawaiian culture can be perpetuated. The boy doesn't understand the importance this is and doesn't really care. When he disrespectfully touches a petroglyph he comes across, he is sent back in time to old Hawai'i not long after the overthrow and annexation of the Hawaiian Kingdom. There he is given a first hand view of what the Hawaiians went through to perpetuate their culture. He, then, realizes the significance of May Day as well as other lessons. In this film, you are able to learn about the Hawaiian culture and face many events where you wonder, "What would happen if things were different?" Some key things to understand is knowing your Hawaiian culture and history. Hawai'i was a sovereign nation till the United States overthrew the kingdom. When President Cleveland found out about the overthrow, he tried to undo the wrong he didn't know about, but Dole, head of the Provisional Government, ignored Cleveland's demand to reinstate the queen. Hawai'i was annexed on August 21, 1959. May Day and Makahiki are congruent seasons and this is the season the boy is in. Makahiki is a time where the Hawaiians compete in games of strength and wit similar to the Olympics. This is a time where war and fighting is banned. The characters are dressed in their traditional Hawaiian clothing to signify that they are rebelling and still practicing in secret to keep their culture alive. They refuse to let their culture die. The ali'i or chief is wearing the 'ahu'ula which is a feather cloak and manhiole which is the helmet to show status. The other Hawaiians are wearing malo, loincloths, and they are like commoners. The Hawaiians wearing the belt shows a status of a warrior. In this film, I wanted to really show the Hawaiian culture and history in a way that is interesting, yet it makes you think. When I learned about what happened, I begun to think, what if some Hawaiians found out about the facts, how would what we read in textbooks be different? Out of the many outcomes I thought about, I decided to make the information be heard, but nothing done with it to show a repeat in what seems to be happening with the boy and May Day. Nothing is happening. If something were to play out different, then that would make a difference. Other than the very obvious message of perpetuating the Hawaiian culture, the underlying message is to be the change. Don't just procrastinate or put things off because you don't want to deal with it because that could make a huge difference.

Screenings

Saturday, October 19 10:30 AM Dole Cannery F Date Passed
Plays with: Student Showcase LEMONADE
LETTERS OF WAR
A DREAM PASSED ON
ELLIPSES
FOLIAGE: ROOTS OF THE TREE BARREL
KAHIAU
CONNECTORS: HAWAIIAN PETREL ON LĀNAʻI
PUMP DON'T DUMP
BARGES
KUNG FU FAMILY
USO LEE

Cast & Crew

Director Anyssa Iwamoto
Screenwriter Anyssa Iwamoto
Producer Anyssa Iwamoto
Cast Kamakalea Akiona, Sam Bader, Ryan Makaʻala Cruz, Paka Davis, John DeRamos III, Evan Enriques, Joselyn Evans-Bautista, Tre Evans-Dumaran, Rihei Grothman, Keliʻi Kailipaka, Micah Kaʻaihue, Chastin Kekahuna, Sara Kim, Kaliopasi Livai, James Sloan, Kalae Trask-Sharpe
Cinematographer Anyssa Iwamoto
Director of Photography Anyssa Iwamoto
Editor Anyssa Iwamoto
Costume Designer Piʻilani Kaʻawaloa, Layne Richards
Casting Director Anyssa Iwamoto
Sound Piʻilani Kaʻawaloa